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What to do if you lose your Kindle

kindleWhat a drag – back to school and back to reality after a wonderful holiday in the Far East. Team Minted aimed to follow that responsible travel advice of taking only photographs and leaving only footprints, which we did, to a certain extent. We also brought home a few stomach bugs plus I left my Kindle in Hong Kong airport.

I’m upset about the Kindle because it was a Christmas present. It was the Paperwhite model which costs about £110. It also had a nice leather case which will be about £30 to replace. I’m convinced that I left it in a plastic tray on the conveyor belt in security. It’s easy to overlook collecting those devices you have to remove from your hand luggage and place separately in the tray. I should have known better to check because the very same happened to a friend of mine except it was her iPad at Gatwick – and she managed to retrieve it.

I emailed the lost property office at Hong Kong airport who responded very quickly that it hasn’t been handed in. Then I tried to contact British Airways from whom I'm still waiting for an answer. I can foresee being pushed from pillar to post while someone else downloads the entire works of Barbara Cartland at my expense. I decided to block my Kindle. You can do this without losing all your books which stay on the app and can be accessed with a new Kindle reader.

For everyone's future reference, this is what you do. I've pulled bits of this from the very helpful website here.

1. Sign in to the Amazon website. Then go to Manage Your Content and Devices (on the Your Account dropdown menu on the right) and select the Your Devices tab.

2. Select your Kindle, copy its serial number to provide to Customer Service then click the Deregister link underneath the Kindle name.

3. In the pop-up message, select the Deregister button.

4. Now contact Amazon Customer Service (preferably by phone) who will make sure that the Kindle cannot be re-registered to someone else. This stops a random person using your account to download lots of content.

5. Change your password. Hackers could use your Kindle to access your social media and other password-protected services.

I assumed I wouldn’t be able to claim on my travel insurance because there was a £200 excess. I was wrong. Because the holiday was booked and paid for long before Mr Minted’s recent redundancy, I had got an all-singing, all-dancing gold annual policy from justtravelcover.com which had no excess. It was pricey but it’s proved its worth and is now pretty much the only bright spark amid the Imodium and the laundry of my post-holiday blues.

See the SMM guide to travel insurance here.

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Comments 1

Jane Wallace on Friday, 25 May 2018 18:07

Just adding an update - my insurer justtravelcover.com did pay out on this claim. It isn't quite a fairytale ending to the story as, according to them, I had not signed up to (or they did not offer) a 'new for old' deal. So they figured out that the wear and tear on a three-month old Paperwhite (cost at the time of writing was £109.99) and its cover (£29.99) was about a tenner and refunded me £130 instead of £140. Well I'd quite like to know how they figured that out but all the same I'm grateful. Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick, as a friend would say.

Just adding an update - my insurer justtravelcover.com did pay out on this claim. It isn't quite a fairytale ending to the story as, according to them, I had not signed up to (or they did not offer) a 'new for old' deal. So they figured out that the wear and tear on a three-month old Paperwhite (cost at the time of writing was £109.99) and its cover (£29.99) was about a tenner and refunded me £130 instead of £140. Well I'd quite like to know how they figured that out but all the same I'm grateful. Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick, as a friend would say.
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Thursday, 13 December 2018